Credit Score Recovery…Post Foreclosure

September 27, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Credit Score Recovery…

POST Foreclosure

Wondering how long it will take your credit score to recover from a home foreclosure or short sale? That depends on how good your credit was in the first place, says John Ulzheimer, a credit score  expert who blogs on the subject for mint.com.

Somewhat depressingly, the better your credit score was before your mortgage woes started, the longer it will take you to recover. Citing data from credit reporting firm FICO, Mr. Ulzheimer said it would take roughly three years for a consumer with a 680 FICO to recover to that level after a foreclosure, compared with seven years for someone with a 780 score. That’s because high scores require “pristine” credit files, he said, while a middling 680 doesn’t.

Late mortgage payments follow the same pattern. A person with a 680 score who pays 30 days late can bounce back to that level in about six months, compared with three years for someone with a 780 score. His (somewhat obvious) advice? Don’t miss payments.

This is where we can help. Want to get back to that status from earlier? Simply contact us for information on how to get your credit life back on track.

By Cesar Marrufo
ELITE FINANCIAL, LLC
Cesar is an expert in the credit repair field, with over 10 years experience reading and analyzing credit reports. For more information or for help with your credit, visit www.elitefinancialllc.com or call (909) 570-9048

Fix Your Credit to Buy a Home

September 20, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

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Today, we got word that another client successfully purchased a home after completing just 4 months in our program! This is great news, and is something that we love to hear. This client, came to us from a mortgage loan officer with a 553 credit score. 11 collection accounts, 5 accounts with many late payments and no open credit. With our help, he opened a credit card to start regaining points, paid off several collections, and had 8 accounts deleted from his credit reports. This gave him a boost of over 90 points!!! He ended up having a mid credit score of 647 and was able to qualify for FHA financing and bought a home for his family. This all happened within 4 months!! Do you know someone that needs a life change? Do you know someone that needs a home? Call us today to learn how this can be you. (909) 570-9048

Legally, how long can bad credit stay on your credit reports?

September 9, 2016 by · 1 Comment 


Let’s say you’ve made some mistakes with your credit. With over 35% of the population scoring below 650 on the FICO scoring scale, you’re certainly not alone. But now that you’ve made the mistake, how long are you going to have to live with it?
Each and every negative item has a reportable statute of limitations. That means the credit bureaus can legally report it for some period of time before it must be removed. Let’s dive in…
Bankruptcy
This one has possibly the most confusing statute of limitations so let’s get it out of the way first. Chapter 7 bankruptcies can remain on your credit files for ten years from the date filed. Chapter 13 bankruptcies can remain on file for seven years FROM THE DISCHARGE DATE. This is important because most people believe 13s have to be removed seven years from the filing date, which is incorrect. It normally takes three to five years for a Chapter 13 to discharge due to the repayment process. That’s when the 7 years begins. The cap on all bankruptcies is ten years so most 13s remain on file for a full ten years, just like Chapter 7s.
Tax Liens
This one has the longest statute of limitations and must be broken down into three categories; released, unpaid, withdrawn.
Released Tax Liens – Released liens can remain on file for seven years from the date released. This included liens that have been settled for less than you really owe.
Unpaid Tax Liens – Sit down. Unpaid tax liens can remain on your credit file indefinitely. That’s the bad news. Now the good news…
Paid and Withdrawn Tax Liens – Paid tax liens normally stay on file for seven years, but the IRS announced that they will withdraw the lien if paid in full AND the taxpayer requests a withdrawal. The credit bureaus do not report withdrawn tax liens so they will come off your files almost immediately if you get them withdrawn.
Defaulted Government Guaranteed Student Loans
The amount of time is actually governed by the Higher Education Act instead of the FCRA. Defaulted student loans can remain on your credit reports for 7 years from the date they are paid, 7 years from the date they were first reported or 7 years from the date the loan re-defaults. The point you should take away from this…pay your student loans!
The Seven Year Club
Delinquent Child Support Obligations
Judgments – Seven years from the filing date whether satisfied or not.
Collections – Seven years from date of default with the ORIGINAL creditor, not seven years from when the collection agency buys or is consigned the debt.
Charge Offs – Seven years from the date of the original terminal delinquency.
Settlements – Seven years from the date of the original terminal delinquency
Repossessions and Foreclosures – Seven years from the date of the original terminal delinquency.
Late Payments – Seven years from the date of occurrence.
You’ll notice “terminal delinquency” several times above. The seven year period actually begins 180 days AFTER the original delinquency that leads to a collection, charge off or similarly negative action. So, technically these items remain on your credit file for 7.5 years from the date of the last delinquency before the terminal delinquency.
Re-aging
If you’ve never heard of this term let’s hope you never do. Re-aging is the illegal process of changing the “purge from date” so the credit reporting extends past the allowable period of time. This is not common but when it’s done, it’s usually a collection agency or debt buyer who is breaking the law. It’s a clear violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Fair Credit Reporting Act but the debtor has to know it has happened.

 

Fix My Credit

September 8, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Life After BK

 

Looking to a fresh start for the new year? Want to take advantage of the historically low rates? Maybe you need to buy a car this year? What ever it is… Look no further! We are the credit repair company for you! We service the entire United States. Our core help is local, how local? Yucaipa, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Highland, Beaumont, Banning, San Bernardino, The High Desert, The Low Desert, Mountain Cities. We have a strong presence in Riverside, CA and Rancho Cucamonga as well. All it takes is a single phone call, email or find us on Facebook for more information.

 

Yucaipa, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Highland, Beaumont, Banning, San Bernardino, The High Desert, The Low Desert, Mountain Cities. We have a strong presence in Riverside, CA and Rancho Cucamonga as well. All it takes is a single phone call, email or find us on Facebook for more information.

Fontana, Rialto, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Etiwanda, Ontario, Loma Linda, Rubidoux

How to Delete and Remove Tax Liens

September 7, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Here is ANOTHER happy camper! We get to see results like this ALL the time and it is very rewarding. Here is a great example…

Our client signs up for our services in July and within 60 days we are able to get the IRS to “Withdraw” (Meaning DELETE) 4 tax liens…1 of which is reporting to the credit bureaus.

Would you like to see results like this for yourself?

 

What are you waiting for? Call us today!

Amazing results

Will Defaulting on Season Tickets Hurt My Credit Score?

September 6, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

season tix

Will Defaulting on Season Tickets Hurt My Credit Score?

Attention sports fans: This answer could prove helpful if your team ticks you off.

We recently received a reader question that was very interesting — something we hadn’t thought of before. This one’s for you sports fans out there:

Does anyone know the impact of defaulting on season tickets will have on one’s credit? Will it have an impact on my car insurance, current loans for cars, or anything else? Please let me know. – Angry Fan

How defaulting on season tickets would impact your credit would depend on whether or not the organization reports the incident to the credit reporting agencies. If the default is reported as a collection, because collection accounts are considered severe delinquencies, the account would have a significant impact on your current credit standing and would hurt your credit scores.

This wouldn’t necessarily impact any accounts you currently have open, but if the impact is significant and your credit scores take a severe hit, it could affect future loans, their interest rates and your ability to qualify for them.

Your question prompted us to make a couple of calls to find out exactly how season ticket holder accounts are handled by major league sporting establishments. Interestingly enough, policies vary depending on the establishment, but what we learned may ease your mind.

According to the two major league establishments I spoke with, season tickets are normally paid for in advance, prior to the tickets being released and issued to the purchaser. Generally speaking, there are no contractual payment plans or financing options for standard individual season ticket purchases.

However, depending on the ticket package, some plans may allow the purchaser to hold their preferred tickets with a deposit, offering them a short grace period before they’re required to pay the remainder of the balance.

In the event the purchaser is unable to pay the remaining balance before the deadline defined by the establishment, the hold is ended and the tickets are re-released to the public for purchase.

In some cases the deposit will be refunded, and in others the deposit may be forfeited. It all depends on the purchase rules outlined by the individual establishment. In either case, defaulting on a season ticket purchase would have no bearing on your credit unless there were a contractual obligation or financing option involved with the purchase.

For corporate packages or purchases where suites are a part of the season ticket package, it’s an entirely different ballgame. Suites are contractual and legally binding. If you sign a contract and default on the purchase agreement, this is when defaulting on season tickets could end up as a collection in your credit reports and hurt your credit scores.

Are Serious Errors Lurking in Your Credit Report?

August 31, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Are Serious Errors Lurking in Your Credit Report?

How accurate is the all-important data in your credit report? It depends on whom you ask.

Previous estimates of credit reports with serious errors vary widely, anywhere from 3 to 25 percent. But according to a recent study paid for by the Consumer Data Industry Association, the trade group for the credit bureaus that assemble and sell credit reports, that rate is much lower. Consumer advocates, meanwhile, were skeptical of those results.

The study, conducted by the Policy and Economic Research Council, found potential errors in 19.2 percent of credit reports examined. But once consumers disputed potentially problematic errors and got the bureaus to fix them, less than 1 percent of these corrected reports led to meaningful increases in credit scores.

And what is meaningful in the credit score context? Well, very few of the corrections led to a big enough credit score gain to push those consumers into a better “credit risk tier,” where they would have access to cheaper loans and such.

But that’s a pretty narrow way to view the results. Consumers typically want to hang on to every last point they can — especially at a time when lenders are reluctant to extend credit.

Score wise, the report found that less than 1 percent of all credit reports examined, or 0.93 percent, prompted a dispute that resulted in a correction that boosted scores by 25 points or more. About 1.2 percent of reports resulted in a score increase of 20 points or more; nearly 1.8 percent of reports saw scores climb 10 points or more; and slightly more than 3 percent had an increase of 1 point or more.

Keep in mind we are not speaking in FICO terms, or the popularly known credit score scale that most lenders use. Instead, the study measured scores using the bureaus’ VantageScore credit score, whose scale ranges from 501 to 990. The higher the score, the better the credit rating.

Consumer advocates pointed out that even seemingly low error rates can affect millions of consumers because each of the big three credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion — have at least 200 million credit files. So a 1 percent error rate would translates into two million consumers per bureau, noted Chi Chi Wu, a staff attorney at the National Consumer Law Center. For those consumers, “the credit bureaus should conduct real and meaningful investigations of disputes, which they do not,” she said.

Here’s how the researchers arrived at their numbers: Over all, the study, which included 2,338 consumers, found that 19.2 percent of credit reports had one or more pieces of information that a consumer believed could be inaccurate and disputed. Of those reports, 63 percent, or 12.1 percent of all reports examined, were found to contain errors that could potentially have “material impacts” that could lead to “possible adverse consequences.” Ultimately, 7 percent of reports in the study were disputed.

Consumers received their credit reports from one or all of the three bureaus, along with a credit score. They were instructed to identify any errors and then to file disputes with the relevant bureau, which then calculated scores based on the corrected report too. The study found that most changes were consistent with the consumers’ requests and that 95 percent of participants who lodged disputes were satisfied with the outcomes.

But satisfaction is almost certainly easier to achieve when you have a dedicated phone line for the participants making disputes — and one of the big bureaus did. Michael Turner, president and chief executive of PERC, said there wasn’t a meaningful difference in the results from the bureau that had the special phone number versus those that did not.

Experts also questioned the way the study participants were found. Instead of being randomly selected from the population at large, they were recruited through the Synovate Global Opinion Panels, where one million consumer members are compensated to complete an average of 12 to 14 surveys annually. But Mr. Turner said that the study’s sample “looks very much like an adult population on every sociodemographic metric.”

“We are transparent and are making available to academics and regulators the underlying data and the results from our independent peer review,” he added.

Still, it wasn’t enough to completely quiet the study’s critics. “To claim less than 1 percent have meaningful errors is kind of like trying to change an “F” to an “A” on you report card,” said John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education at SmartCredit.com, who also pointed out that the study thanks the three credit bureaus for providing “numerous insights, guidance, and invaluable assistance with the implementation of the research.”

The Federal Trade Commission is conducting a nationwide study of its own that also examines the accuracy of credit reports. It’s expected to deliver its results next year, and, it may include recommendations for legislative action. Perhaps that study will provide more clarity.

Have you discovered any serious errors in your credit report? What did you do to fix them? And what do you think of the study?

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD

http://bucks.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/07/are-serious-errors-lurking-in-your-credit-report/

7 Steps to Buying a Home You Can Actually Afford

August 30, 2016 by · 3 Comments 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So you would like to take advantage of the current housing market but you don’t know where to begin? Here is a quick 7 step list I discovered that can help you get started. Happy house hunting!

 

1) Get your credit in as good shape as possible. Your credit score can make a big difference in your interest rate and lenders are  a lot stricter than they used to be. You can start by ordering a free copy of your credit report from each of the credit bureaus at annualcreditreport.com as long as you haven’t done so in the last 12 months. One study showed that about 70% of credit reports have errors in them so check to see if there are any in yours that could be hurting your credit score and if so, be sure to have them corrected.

You can also use a site like creditkarma.com to see your credit score for free and more importantly, figure out what steps you can take to improve it. The key things are to make sure you make your debt payments on time, pay off as much of your debt as possible (except perhaps car and student loans, which tend to be relatively low interest), and be careful of closing accounts. If you have a credit card that is charging you an annual fee, see if you can convert the card into a no-fee card rather than close it.

2) Be ready with your down payment. Ideally, you would be able to put down 20% of your home’s purchase price to avoid having to pay PMI (private mortgage insurance). If you can’t put down 20%, mortgage companies will usually offer you a smaller “piggy back loan” to help bridge the gap but those loans have higher interest rates.

Don’t dip too far into your savings though. Try to keep at least 3-6 months of expenses set aside for emergencies. If you don’t have enough money available in your regular accounts, you can access up to $10k without penalties from IRAs for a first-time home purchase and your employer’s retirement plan may allow you to borrow from your retirement account with a longer time to pay off home loans. There’s always the “family and friends” route too.

3) Try to pick a mortgage with a fixed rate for the longest time that you think you’ll be keeping the home. That’s because you could see your monthly payments jump up on a variable rate mortgage when interest rates eventually start climbing. On the other hand, fixed rate mortgages have higher interest rates so it may not make sense to pay more to lock in a fixed rate for longer than you need it.

4) Choose the right loan term for your needs. A 30-yr loan has lower monthly payments and can be advantageous if you’ll make good use of the savings by investing them or paying down high interest debt. You can always make extra payments if you want to pay the loan off sooner. But if you’re honestly more likely to splurge the money you save each month, the 15-yr loan could be better since it will cost you less in interest and be a form of forced savings every month.

5) Shop around for a mortgage. Even a slightly higher rate can mean paying significantly more over the life of the loan so don’t just talk to your existing bank. Consider credit unions, which often offer lower loan rates because they’re non-profit. Some brokerage firms like Charles Schwab offer mortgages and sometimes provide discounts for people who keep a lot of money with them. You can also try Web sites like bankrate.com and eloan.com or an independent mortgage broker who can shop around from multiple mortgage companies to find the one that can offer you the best deal. You can then use this calculator to compare the loans.

6) Figure out how much home you can afford. Remember, just because the mortgage company will loan you the money doesn’t mean you should take it. There are rules of thumb like not spending more than 28% of your income on mortgage payments but every person’s situation is different. Two people may have the same income but one may need to save more for retirement or have to make large private school tuition payments for their kids. Take a look at your current saving and spending needs to see how much you can realistically afford to pay each month and don’t forget to leave some room for the potential “hidden expenses” of home ownership like utility bills, HOA fees if applicable, and repairs and maintenance.

7) Start house hunting. Once you’ve gotten pre-approved on a mortgage, work with a real estate agent experienced in the neighborhoods you’re interested in and look at homes that are within your affordable price range. Make sure you look at several places even if you fall in love with the first one you see as you may change your mind with more perspective. Finally, don’t forget to have fun. If you’ve made it this far, you’ve earned it!

From Newswire
Liz Davidson,
Financial Finesse

 

Authorized-user credit card plans can be useful, and abused

August 26, 2016 by · 1 Comment 

Authorized-user credit card plans can be useful, and abused

“Authorized user” sounds like a term you’d find on the warning label of a heavy-duty power tool. (Authorized users only! All other users risk injury or death.)

But in the world of credit reports, an “authorized user” is someone who is allowed to use another individual’s credit card without being responsible for the bill.

That sounds like a sweet deal for the authorized user. But millions of people with good credit use this strategy to help their children or spouses build a solid credit history. Thanks to a recent turnaround by Fair Isaac, developer of the widely used FICO score, this avenue to good credit will continue to be available.

First, some background: When a credit card holder designates a child, spouse or other individual as an authorized user, the card holder’s payment history appears on the authorized user’s credit report. If the card holder has stellar credit, it will boost the authorized user’s credit score. More than 50 million consumers are listed as authorized users on another person’s credit card, according to Fair Isaac.

But in recent years, some credit-repair outfits have exploited authorized-user accounts in ways that Fair Isaac never intended. These companies arrange for people with good credit to “rent” their histories to strangers with tarnished credit.

“Some consumers were paying thousands of dollars to be added to someone’s account to get a short-term increase in their credit rating,” says Tom Quinn, vice president of scoring solutions for Fair Isaac. Fair Isaac officials were concerned that the practice, known as piggybacking, allowed consumers with bad credit to artificially inflate their scores.

In an effort to stop this practice, Fair Isaac announced last year that its new scoring formula, known as FICO 08, wouldn’t recognize authorized-user accounts. Critics said the change would lower credit scores for millions of consumers, forcing them to pay more for everything from mortgages to car loans.

About 1% of consumers would no longer have enough of a credit history to get a score at all, according to a survey by Credit.com, a consumer website. Without a credit score, it’s very difficult to qualify for a loan.

Lenders, meanwhile, raised a regulatory concern. They told Fair Isaac that they used FICO scores to comply with the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, which requires lenders to consider a spouse’s credit history when weighing a potential borrower’s credit risk. If Fair Isaac stopped recognizing authorized users, lenders said they wouldn’t be able to use FICO scores to meet that requirement.

In response, Fair Isaac sent its scoring model back to the laboratory. Company analysts came up with a new version of FICO 08 that will continue to recognize authorized-user accounts but make it more difficult for credit-repair agencies to manipulate credit scores, Quinn says. Fair Isaac declined to provide details on how its new formula will close the piggybacking loophole. The company says it’s working with the three credit-reporting agencies to get FICO 08 adopted as quickly as possible.

“This is great news,” says John Ulzheimer, president of educational services for Credit.com, an outspoken critic of the original proposal. “I’m thrilled with Fair Isaac’s willingness to take a second look at this.”

A credit-building tool

Ulzheimer believes the authorized-user designation offers a valuable way for parents to help children learn how to manage credit without giving them their own credit card. “It’s like a credit card with training wheels,” he says.

There’s no downside for the child, because an authorized user has no liability for the account, Ulzheimer says. If the parent falls behind on payments, the child can ask to have the authorized-user designation removed from his or her credit report.

“When you have someone as an authorized user on a credit card, you give them an escape route,” Ulzheimer says. “If you lose your job or get into a horrible financial mess, you’re not dragging them down with you.”

Still, credit cards, like power tools, can cause a lot of havoc if they’re handled improperly. For that reason, Quinn says, parents who name children as authorized users should set clear limits on how the card should be used.

“When I went to college, I was listed on my dad’s credit card as an authorized user, but I was strictly told it could only be used for emergency purposes and not to buy a round of beer for everybody,” he says. “When it’s done in a family environment where the practices of sound credit are taught, it’s very beneficial.”

Sandra Block covers personal finance for USA TODAY. Her Your Money column appears Tuesdays. Click here for an index of Your Money columns. E-mail her at: sblock@usatoday.com.

 

Never Dispute Online

August 23, 2016 by · 3 Comments 

 

In my daily grind, I come across many real estate professionals trying to lend a helping hand to their clients in helping with credit issues. In some cases it can be considered as “minor” work. But for most, I find that they prefer using the online websites for generating a dispute to the credit bureaus. This is a Big NO-NO!  For several reasons detailed below, this online dispute does very little to help you out. Not to mention most real estate professionals, unfortunately, are handling the dispute process incorrectly to begin with. But when  they do go beyond their scope of expertise, the following usually happens;

1)      Time – The credit reporting agencies do not have to process an online request. The online dispute gets tracked automatically and a request to verify is automatically forwarded to the data furnisher through e-oscar. The restrictive 30 day clock is accomplished easier if everything is automated.

2)      Paper trail- with online disputes there is no paper trail to evidence the details of the dispute, and creating a paper trail during credit repair is essential.

3)      Limited Dispute Reasons- With the limitations of dispute reasons, an accurate description of the dispute is difficult in most cases. It will all get broken down to its most simple form.

4)      Expeditious Dispute Resolution- The Fair Credit Reporting Act section 611a(8) changes the standard requirements and protection afforded to the consumer by the FCRA.

When the Fair Credit Reporting Act was amended, they put in a section for “Expedited Dispute Resolution” Section 611a(8) the on-line dispute system. It reads as follows…

“…the agency shall not be required to comply with paragraphs 2, 6 and 7 with respect to that dispute if they delete the tradeline within 3 days.”

Paragraph 2 requires the CRA to forward your dispute and all related documentation you provide to the furnisher. They rarely forward the documentation.

Paragraph 6 requires the CRA to provide you with written results of the investigation.

Paragraph 7 requires the CRA to provide you with the method of verification on request from the consumer.

What they are doing is…

The Credit Reporting Agency (CRA) can delete a disputed trade line for 30 days, then, the trade line can reappear when the furnisher (creditor or collector) reports it again in the next cycle. That is because the CRA is not required to tell the furnisher you disputed it thanks to section 2 being omitted.  This is sometimes called a “soft delete” and it is not permanent.

Furthermore, you lose your rights to request “Method of Verification” (MOV) so you lose this powerful tool in the dispute process thanks to Paragraph 7 being omitted.

Finally, another powerful tool we use often is the five-day written notice of re-insertion.  Essentially, what that means is that if a credit bureau is going to re-insert a previously deleted item, they must inform you in writing five days prior to re-inserting it. I have rarely ever seen them give that notice.

That five-day notice is only required if the credit bureau takes longer then 45 days to complete. IF it is deleted via the expedited system, often completed in three days, the five-day written notice is no longer required.

 

So, let’s let the experts handle their own respective expertise and call a professional credit repair company when help is needed.