Are the Holidays busy for you? They are busy for credit bureaus too!

September 26, 2016 by · 2 Comments 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now is the best time for credit repair!

The three credit reporting agencies – Experian, Equifax and Trans Union – get overwhelmed during the holidays, specifically between Thanksgiving and New Year’s. The reason is credit card companies flood the agencies with holiday “Instant Approval” applications to be processed with credit checks. Then throw in the fact a large number of staff at the bureaus, credit card companies, and collection agencies are using their vacation days during this time. This under staffing and overwhelming workload makes it difficult to get all of the credit reports resolved during this time. The good news for consumers is that more negative accounts are deleted during this time than at any other time of the year.
Staffing at the Credit Bureaus in the Customer Service Areas Handles:
• Taking In and Logging Disputes
• Verifying Information
Taking in Disputes – The Call Center
Apparently, the attrition rate is VERY high in call centers, as is the “call off rate” (people calling in for personal time and sick time.) On an average day the call off rate is about 10-15%. If a customer service pool consists of 200 employees, this means that 20 people are absent. Often, the missing employee workload plus any additional high volume can be transferred to a third party vendor.
During the holidays, many employees want to spend their vacation with their families, and the call off rate is about 25%. All credit bureau call centers are not just under the thumb of the FTC and the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). Their customer service must also follow federally mandated guidelines, the Average Speed of Answer or ASA. They can’t just let the phones ring off the hook.
Credit Dispute Verification
Like the call centers, the credit dispute investigation department has extremely high turnover and attrition, and they don’t get the best candidates for the positions because they pay so poorly. The people doing the investigative work pay their staff even less than the call center people and can’t hold the ones they have. It’s no wonder credit reports contain so many errors. Part of the problem seems to be training. The credit bureaus must abide by many different kinds of law and most people of the caliber they recruit aren’t up to learning the details and technical information.
If a dispute is sent, and it seems knowledgeable as far as the FCRA, the dispute is sent to Special Handling. The employees in “special handling” are merely people that have been employed for a few years, not necessarily those with better (or any training).

Take Advantage of These Times!

Take the hypothetical situation that a Call Center Manager faces: a ton of investigations sitting in a system waiting for verification, as well as high call volumes and not enough people to handle them. Many times people are pulled from the investigation area to answer the phones, lest they get in trouble with the government for not keeping to the federally mandated ASA.

In the meantime, credit disputes are piling up, and the staff to handle them is diminished. Disputes are sitting there waiting, with very few people to work them. The FCRA states that if a credit bureau cannot verify information in a dispute, the information must be deleted. Many times the information is deleted just so the credit bureaus can stay within federal guidelines.

The bottom line is that from around the end of November until after the 1st of the year, productivity is at an all time low because they have staffing issues. This is the best time of year for Credit Repair.

 

Mapping the Path to Your Credit Report

September 21, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

 

Wonder how your credit report is created? Sometimes it’s best not to know how the sausage is made, but in this case some extra knowledge may be enlightening.

John Ulzheimer, a credit expert, worked with the Web site Credit Sesame to create a graphic map showing how various types of information make their way — or not — into your credit report.

In most cases, Mr. Ulzheimer said,  the credit bureaus — like Equifax, Experian and Transunion — receive information from institutions where you have accounts, like credit card issuers or home loans or student loan lenders. In industry lingo, these are known as “trade” or “tradeline” accounts, he said.

Those accounts make up the bulk of the information in your credit report. Institutions provide the data under agreement with the bureaus, in exchange for access to credit files so they can evaluate the creditworthiness of applicants. Institutions aren’t legally required to report credit information — but if they don’t, they lose the benefit of having access to credit reports.

When credit bureaus get customer data, he said, they generally audit it before posting it to your credit file, to help avoid errors and disputes. A batch of data with an unusually high proportion of delinquencies, for instance, might be sent back for double-checking.

When lenders seek your credit report in response to an application for a credit card or a loan, it shows up as a “hard” inquiry. Too many such inquiries may cause your credit score, which is based on information in your credit report, to dip.

Some inquiries don’t affect your score, however. They include requests made as a result of applying for insurance or for service from a utility company, Mr. Ulzheimer said, and requests you make yourself for a copy of your credit report.

Some public records, like bankruptcy filings or federal tax liens, usually appear on your credit reports because the credit bureaus have electronic access to federal courts through the Pacer document system. But civil judgments filed with state and county courts may or may not show up on your report, since not all of those courts make such information available electronically. Credit bureaus may be able to find the information through database services, but its appearance in credit files is generally less consistent than legal information generated by federal courts. (In other words,  you may get lucky.)

Have you ever had a legal judgment appear on your credit report? What impact did it have?

By ANN CARRNS

For Credit Sesame

 

Why Do Insurance Companies Use Credit Reports and Scores?

September 19, 2016 by · 4 Comments 

credit scores

Section 604 of the Fair Credit Reporting Act says that the credit reporting agencies, Equifax (EFX), Experian (EXPN) and TransUnion, may furnish reports to any company that intends to use that information for the purpose of underwriting insurance. So, at the Federal level, the use of credit reports for underwriting insurance is perfectly legal and many of them do so. The real question is, why do they do it?

Insurance companies have the same issues lenders have: understanding the risk of doing business with certain consumers. It’s not necessarily the risk of being paid or not being paid for their services (premiums). It’s more so the risk of providing a policy for someone who is more likely to file claims and thus be a less profitable customer. It’s all about the money.

The primary difference between banking and insurance is that insurance policies are all secured, essentially. If you don’t pay your premiums they’ll cut you off, which could lead to you losing your home (it’s called a non-monetary default) or you getting arrested for driving without insurance. Determining whether or not you’ll pay your premiums is not the primary reason some of them pull your credit reports and credit scores.

The primary reason is to determine if they even want to do business with you and/or under what terms. Despite what many believe, how you manage your credit is very predictive of what kind of insurance customer you’ll be. It’s predictive not only of your likelihood of filing claims but also predictive of how profitable you’ll be. If it weren’t, insurance companies wouldn’t spend the money buying millions of credit reports and scores each year.

They’re Not The Same Credit Scores

Much like the financial services environment, the insurance environment relies heavily on credit scores. This isn’t anything new. However, the type of score they’re using is not the same type of score banks and other financial services companies use. In fact, they’re very different.

The scores used by insurance companies are called Insurance Credit Bureau Scores or Insurance Risk Credit Scores. They are developed by a variety of companies, including FICO and LexisNexis.  LexisNexis develops the LexisNexis Attract Score, which is very commonly used by insurance companies.

Insurance scores consider credit information and/or previous insurance claim information. So, if you filed an auto claim or a homeowner’s claim it can be considered in your insurance score and it can result in a lower score. And if you’re assuming the presence of claims means that you’re a less profitable insurance customer, well, you’d be right. Yes, it’s all about the money.

But They’re The Same Credit Reports

While the scores used by insurance companies are different, the reports they use are the same as the reports used by financial services companies.  The reason: all credit reports originate from the same three places; Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Point being, there are no secret credit reports that insurance companies use to set your premiums.

Insurance Inquiries Don’t Hurt Your Credit Scores

Enough bad news. When you apply for insurance, the insurance company may or may not access your credit reports and scores. There is no guarantee that they will, in fact, pull your credit reports. But, it’s a safe bet.

If the insurance company does choose to access your credit report and score, there will an inquiry posted to the credit file.  It will clearly be identified as being from your insurance company.  And, more importantly, it will systemically be coded as coming from an insurance company.  This is good news because insurance related inquiries are not counted in your credit scores.

You will be able to see them, but no other entity will be able to see them.  And, credit-scoring systems don’t not consider insurance-related inquiries so they’ll never lower your credit scores.

I’ll end on that high note.

By John Ulzheimer here

http://www.mint.com/blog/how-to/insurance-credit-score-03072011/

Fix My Credit

September 8, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Life After BK

 

Looking to a fresh start for the new year? Want to take advantage of the historically low rates? Maybe you need to buy a car this year? What ever it is… Look no further! We are the credit repair company for you! We service the entire United States. Our core help is local, how local? Yucaipa, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Highland, Beaumont, Banning, San Bernardino, The High Desert, The Low Desert, Mountain Cities. We have a strong presence in Riverside, CA and Rancho Cucamonga as well. All it takes is a single phone call, email or find us on Facebook for more information.

 

Yucaipa, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Highland, Beaumont, Banning, San Bernardino, The High Desert, The Low Desert, Mountain Cities. We have a strong presence in Riverside, CA and Rancho Cucamonga as well. All it takes is a single phone call, email or find us on Facebook for more information.

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How to Delete and Remove Tax Liens

September 7, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Here is ANOTHER happy camper! We get to see results like this ALL the time and it is very rewarding. Here is a great example…

Our client signs up for our services in July and within 60 days we are able to get the IRS to “Withdraw” (Meaning DELETE) 4 tax liens…1 of which is reporting to the credit bureaus.

Would you like to see results like this for yourself?

 

What are you waiting for? Call us today!

Amazing results

Does Opting Out of Credit Card Offers Improve Credit Scores?

September 5, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

opt out

Ask the Expert: Does Opting Out of Credit Card Offers Improve Credit Scores?

September 16, 2013 by John Ulzheimer

The world of consumer credit is loaded with myths, some more stubborn to debunk than others. Credit scores are used by employers, you build credit faster by carrying credit card balances, credit scores reward you for being in debt, opting out will improve your credit scores.  None of these things are actually true and it’s the last myth that I’ll address today.

What is opting out?

Today when you get home from work or school and check your mail you’ll likely find one or more credit card offers from credit card issuers. Those offers are likely of the “preapproved” variety, which means the credit card issuer has actually determined that they are willing to offer you a credit card even though you never asked for one.

The credit card issuer purchased your name, along with many others, from one of the credit reporting agencies through a process called “prescreening.”  Prescreening is the process whereby the card issuer gives the credit bureau a list of criteria and wants a list of consumer names and addresses that meet that criteria.

So, for example, I might ask one of the credit bureaus to provide me with list of 1,000,000 names and addresses belonging to consumers who live in the metro Atlanta area who have VantageScore credit scores above 725, don’t have any late payments in the past 24 months, and don’t have more than $10,000 of credit card debt. This is called “selection criteria.” Of course, the credit bureaus have to tap into their credit file database in order determine who meets this criteria.

If the credit card issuer acquires your name and address using this method then they have to make you what’s referred to as a “firm offer of credit or insurance.” This is normally done by sending you a credit card offer in the mail saying that you’ve been pre-approved for some amount of credit. All of this will result in a “promotional” inquiry being posted on your credit report.

The Fair Credit Reporting Act gives consumers the ability to prevent the credit bureaus from selling their names to lenders through a process called “Opting Out.” You can do this for free at www.optoutprescreen.com.  You can opt out forever or for a shorter amount of time. After a few months you’ll stop getting preapproved credit card offers in the mail.

The opting out myth

Some people suggest that you will improve your credit scores by opting out. The problem is that it’s not true. Opting out has no impact, at all, on your credit scores.

The only direct influence opting out has on your credit reports is to prevent new promotional inquiries from being added. But, promotional inquiries are of the “soft” variety and they have no impact on your credit scores anyway so preventing them doesn’t do anything for your scores.

Advantages to opting out

That certainly doesn’t mean there’s no value to opting out. You’ll certainly reduce or fully eliminate credit card offers, which means less mail to throw away or shred. And, because those credit card offers can be used by credit card fraudsters to open new cards in your name opting out can help to minimize your risk of credit card identity theft. But, that’s where the value ends.

Original article here: http://www.creditsesame.com/blog/ask-the-expert-does-opting-out-of-credit-card-offers-improve-credit-scores/

Effective Credit Report Repair Tips

September 2, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

 

Credit repair, done right, can do wonders for your credit report and your scores too! Here are a few tricks of the credit repair trade that will really make your scores move fast. Put them to work individually, or all at once, depending on your own needs, and watch the magic happen.

1) Open Accounts Right Now!!!
The FICO scoring model will give you bonus points for opening new accounts after a period of bad credit. It is all in the timing. Those old cards that survived the tough times are still worth something, but when it comes to credit repair FICO wants you to prove that you still have what it takes to get back in the swing of borrowing money. If your credit is crummy, secured credit cards are ideal. Small is good! Open now, pay on time, keep your balances low, and your scores may rise over 100 points in the next six months.

2) The Balance-Limit Connection
This credit repair tip is just as urgent for those opening new accounts today as it is for those managing already well seasoned revolving accounts. A little change in your balances can send your credit scores flying or diving. Have you maxed out a card lately and then checked out your scores? This is a fairly recent FICO tweak which can work for or against you. Try to use less than 30 percent of your limit for the best result.

3) Take a Look!
Have you seen you credit report lately? If not, why not??? There may be errors lurking and a simple dispute or challenge to the credit bureaus may be all it will take to get your scores back on track. Not sure how to check your report or how to dispute? Contact a professional right away. Good luck!

By Cesar Marrufo
ELITE FINANCIAL, LLC.com

Consumer Protection Through Education.

What determines your credit score?

August 10, 2016 by · 1 Comment 

FICO Scores are calculated from a wide variety of different credit data in your credit report. This data can be grouped into five categories as outlined below. The percentages reflect how important each of the categories is in determining your score. These percentages are based on the importance of the five categories for the general population. The importance of these categories may vary for particular groups – for example, people who have not been using credit long might find less importance on amounts owed and greater importance on payment history. Paying your bills on time and paying down account balances are the top two factors that can help or hurt your credit score regardless of who you are and what your credit situation is! Here’s a breakdown of how your credit score is calculated:

• 10 % Types of Credit Used
• 10% New Credit
• 15% Length of Credit History
• 30% Amounts Owed
• 35% Payment History

Knowing and more importantly understanding these figures can help a great amount towards getting your credit score back on track. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Will a wage garnishment affect your credit score?

August 8, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Will a wage garnishment affect your credit score?

A wage garnishment, which results after a court order says a lender can obtain money a borrower owes by going through the borrower’s employer, won’t show up on your credit report and therefore, won’t impact your credit score.

“Garnishments do not have a direct impact on your credit scores because they are not picked up by the credit bureaus and placed on credit files,” John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education for SmartCredit.com, tells MainStreet.

An Experian spokesperson also confirmed with MainStreet that the credit bureau does not receive information about wage garnishments.

“Although garnishment proceedings are a matter of public court record, they are not reported on Equifax consumer credit files,” a spokesperson from Equifax also told MainStreet.

But that doesn’t mean it won’t send up a red flag to lenders that you can’t pay back your debts and shouldn’t qualify for a loan.

“Garnishments aren’t a secret to prospective lenders,” Ulzheimer says. “Applications for things like mortgages will usually ask for obligations and liabilities, and you’ll have to disclose the fact that your wages are being garnished.”

http://www.mainstreet.com/article/moneyinvesting/credit/debt/credit-qa-will-wage-garnishment-affect-my-score

By Jeanine Skowronski

New to the U.S? Here are credit building options, and hurdles…

August 5, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

New to the US? How can you build credit?

Dear Credit Card Adviser,
My son and his family recently moved to the U.S. after living abroad for 11 years. His wife does not have a Social Security number. Can she qualify for a credit card? Are there other actions she can take to boost her credit history?
— M.

Dear M.,
This is a trickier question than it seems, with many parts. Let’s start with your son’s wife, or your daughter-in-law, and discuss how to get her a credit card.

Depending on the creditor, she may or may not need a Social Security number to apply for a credit card. Capital One and Chase require this number on their credit card applications. Discover and Bank of America accept Social Security numbers, but they also will take a taxpayer identification number issued by the Internal Revenue Service.

American Express accepts several forms of identification: Social Security, taxpayer ID, a foreign driver’s license or a foreign-issued passport. Citi doesn’t require a Social Security number, but applicants who don’t have one may be asked to show a government-issued ID at the closest Citi bank branch.

Your daughter-in-law also can be added as an authorized user on many credit cards without an SSN.

Now, let’s look at her credit history. Unfortunately, your daughter-in-law’s foreign credit history can’t be transferred to the U.S. But she can start building one here even though she doesn’t have a Social Security number. It’s best to have one, though, to ensure her credit information is recorded accurately, says Maxine Sweet, vice president of public education at Experian.

“Name and current address are the minimum requirement, but we strongly encourage the lender to provide the SSN, date of birth and previous address if it was within the last two years,” she says. “That additional information can be very important in helping us match the account to the correct consumer.”

TransUnion also builds credit histories on individuals without a Social Security number. Equifax didn’t respond to emails asking about their minimum identification requirements for a credit report.

Getting a Social Security number isn’t easy. Generally, only immigrants OK’d to work in the country by the Department of Homeland Security qualify for an SSN, according to the Social Security Administration website. There are exceptions, so contact the agency for more information.

Now, here’s a potential problem you probably didn’t anticipate: Your son may have a hard time getting a credit card, too. If your son didn’t maintain any open or active U.S.-based credit — such as a mortgage, credit card or other loan — while he was abroad, a lender probably won’t be able to pull his credit score. He may not even have a U.S. credit file anymore.

A U.S. credit report from Experian, Equifax and TransUnion is based on payment history on mortgages, car loans, student loans, personal loans, credit cards and other loans he got here. If he doesn’t have any activity on these types of accounts in the past year or so, his credit report has gone stale, says John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education at SmartCredit.com.

“At that point, the credit report will cease to be scoreable under any credit score criteria,” he explains. Credit scoring models need recent activity to calculate a credit score. No activity, no credit score. No credit score, no new credit in most cases.

That’s not all. The credit reporting agencies don’t maintain credit files indefinitely. By law, negative credit information must fall off credit reports after seven years. Bankruptcies disappear after 10 years. Sounds good, right? But Ulzheimer says credit reporting agencies will eventually drop the good stuff, too. After 11 years, your son’s credit history may have vanished.

Your son should see if he has a credit report. If he does, he should give it a thorough read and make sure there aren’t any errors. He can pull his credit reports from each of the bureaus for free once every 12 months at AnnualCreditReport.com. If he finds he has little or no credit history, he will need to start building credit again the same way a young adult does: through a secured credit card or as an authorized user.

Secured credit cards require an upfront deposit to act as collateral against the line of credit. The deposit equals the credit limit, and it’s placed in a money market account or certificate of deposit while the account is open. Typical deposits run between $300 and $500. The problem is that you need at least six months’ worth of activity on the card before a FICO credit score — the most widely used score out there — can be created.

This is where you, as a parent, can help out, if you have good credit history. Adding your son (and daughter-in-law) as an authorized user on a credit card (or two) will immediately populate his credit file with the card’s payment history. That means he’ll have a calculable credit score, too. He’ll be able to apply for credit in his own name and build from there. Good luck to the whole family!

By Janna Herron | Bankrate.com